DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HISTORY

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR

FALL SEMESTER 2001

Anthropology

Economics

History

Pre-Law

Political Science

Sociology

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 1202 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Development of culture, adjustments to environment and society on different levels of cultural complexity.

T, F 9:55-11:10AM Rosen

M, 5:25-8:00PM Staff

ECONOMICS

ECON 1111 BEGINNER'S ECONOMICS

Introductory survey of economic philosophers, philosophies and the central questions of modern economics. The course offers a basic working vocabulary in economics and relies on a minimal amount of mathematical expression for students with no previous exposure to the field. Among the central concepts breached are markets and regulation, trade and tariffs, fiscal and monetary policy, distribution and redistribution.

T, F 9:55-11:10AM Jonnard

HISTORY

HIST 1140 SPORT HISTORY

A survey of physical and mental competition from ancient Greece, Rome and Assyria to the modern day. Includes references to the political, sociocultural and economic influences on sport as well as the influence of sport on history.

T, 6:50-9:10PM Weitz

HIST 1201 ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS

Survey of the various cultures of the ancient world form the beginning of civilization in the Near East, India, China, Africa and Central America to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West.

T, F 11:20-12:35PM O'Brien

HIST 1203 FOUNDATIONS OF THE MODERN WORLD

A survey of the development of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to the end of the American Revolution.

M, TH 9:55-11:10AM McTague

TH 6:00-8:35PM O'Brien

T, F 8:30-9:45AM O'Brien

HIST 1205 AMERICAN THEMES

This course seeks to equip history majors with the proper tools to "do" history and to acquaint them with the various approaches and methods that historians take in writing history. Hence, it is reading and writing intensive. The subject matter of the course this semester is Race and Sex-- the interplay between race and sex in American history and the ways in which race, gender, and sexuality converge. Among the topics we will explore are: the origins of racial stereotypes, anti-miscegenation laws, sex across the color line, coerced sex, and lynching.

M, TH 12:45-2:00PM Sommerville

HIST 2325 CATACOMBS TO CATHEDRALS

A survey of the major monuments and issues surrounding and reflected by art and architecture in medieval Europe, including late antiquity, Byzantium, the Carolingian renaissance, Ottonian art, the medieval manuscript, Italian romanesque and Norman art, and both early Gothic and international Gothic architecture.

W , 7:00-9:30PM Jerris

HIST 2359 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877

This is the first semester of a two semester sequence in African-American history. The course explores selected major developments, issues and interpretations unique to the past of Americans of African ancestry from the 17th century through the end of the Civil War and emancipation. Among the topics covered are: the trans-Atlantic slave trade; the development of racism; free blacks; master-slave relations; antislavery and abolitionism; slave revolts; sexual exploitation; and, the slave family.

T, F 9:55-11:10AM Sommerville

HIST 2367 PRESENTING HISTORY TO THE PUBLIC

The study and practice of presenting history to a public audience (rather than to an academic audience of students or experts). Focus is on museum exhibits, historic houses, sites, documentary film, oral history and interactive media.

T, TH 3:35-4:50PM Finklestein

HIST 3303 THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR

Arguably the most traumatic experience in American history, the Civil War continues to fascinate scholars and laymen. This course looks at the causes leading to the conflict, the conduct of the war, and the consequences that followed. Readings will include standard works of military and political history as well as cultural studies.

W, 12:45-3:15PM Evans

HIST 3347 HISTORY OF MODERN CHINA

An introduction to the history of China, focusing on the 20th century, but also providing background to its 4,000-year-old culture, the Communist Revolution and the political system so long under the influence and domination of Chairman Mao Tse-tung; and the forces of "hard line" Communism that are restraining the powerful drive for democratization.

T, 12:45-3:25PM Salzman

HIST 3440 EUROPE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

This course explores how Europe has been incredibly altered by World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, colonial imperialism, and the Cold War. The military, political, and cultural aspects of contemporary Europe are covered through history textbooks, key novels, and crucial memoirs.

W, 10:00-12:30PM McTague

HIST 3499 PRACTICUM IN PUBLIC HISTORY CANCELLED!

Workaday world of presenting history to a public audience is explored by placing students museum internships and facilitating the practical work of scholarship, research, evaluating primary documents and constructing and maintaining exhibitions. (Instructor approval required.)

 

 

PRE-LAW

ENGW 3001 ADVANCED WRITING WORKSHOP

Principles of expository prose: focus on style, tone, organization, purpose and audience.

W 6:-8:35 PM Skaggs-McTague

 

PHIL 1101 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC

Informal fallacies, truth and validity, principles and deductive reasoning, immediate inference, categorical syllogisms, compound arguments.

M,Th 9:55-11:10 Winters

W 6:00-8:35 pm Nguyen

POLS 2250 POLITICAL METHODOLOGY

Methods of research: research design, development of testing instruments and sample collection and analysis of data and preparation of reports.

M, F 12:45-2:00PM Larson

 

POLS 4475 LAW AND PRACTICE (1 credit)

Based on presentations from a wide-array of legal practitioners, this seminar examines competing perspectives on the law and legal work, answers student questions about legal careers, and explores the differences between "law in the book and the law in action".

Meets every other week. M 2:30-3:45PM Peabody

POLS 4471 CURRENT LEGAL ISSUES (1 credit)

This Senior Seminar explores major legal issues "in the news". Students use primary resources, including Supreme Court oral arguments and opinions, as well as recent scholarship to examine the ways in which the law intersects with, and shapes, political debates, controversies, and policy.

Meets every other week. F 12:45-3:25PM Peabody

SOCI 2203 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

An introduction to the methods of social research: research design, development of testing instruments and sample collection and analysis of data and preparation of reports. (Prerequisite: SOCI 1201 Introduction to Sociology.)

W 9:30-12:00 Larson

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 1201 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

Structure and function of American national government; roles of interest groups and political parties, voting behavior, powers of president, Congress, bureaucracy and federal judiciary.

M, TH 11:20-12:35PM Staff

M, TH 12:45-2:00PM Peabody

M, TH 2:10-3:25PM Staff

T, F 8:30-9:45AM Pope

T, F 11:20-12:35AM Staff

TH, 6-9:30PM Starting 9/13, 7 weeks Pope

POLI 1220 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

Analysis and comparison of contemporary political institutions and processes of selected countries.

T, F 11:20-12:35AM Kishan

T, F 2:10-3:25PM Nichols

TH 6:00-9:30PM Starting 11/8, 7 weeks Staff

POLS 2230 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Theories and problems of international politics and foreign policy.

M, TH 12:45-2:00PM Salzman

POLS 2250 POLITICAL METHODOLOGY (crsl SOCI 2203)

Methods of research: research design, development of testing instruments and sample collection and analysis of data and preparation of reports.

W 9:30AM-12:00PM Larson

POLS 2300 CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS

Introduction to and survey of election laws, including ballot access regultion, campaign finance, and structures of primary elections, polling, advertising, the role of parties, media relations.

M, TH 11:20-12:35PM Larson

POLS 2303 ELECTORAL COLLEGE

Close investigation of the history and origins of the U.S. electoral college, reforms made, proposals for reform, and the causal relation between the electoral college and the modern presidential campaign.

WEB Based offering, Staff

POLS 3306 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

Development, scope and role of judicial review; problems of federalism; civil rights and civil liberties.

T, F 11:20-12:35PM Rosen

POLS 3320 CHINESE POLITICS

An examination of the government, political institutions, and political party structure of the People's Republic of China; the evolving systems and policies from the time of Imperial, Nationalist and "liberation" China, as well as those of the Cultural Revolution and post-Mao eras; the forces of "hard-line" Communism that are restraining the powerful drive for democratization.

T 12:45-3:25PM Salzman

POLS 3338 INDIA AND ITS NEIGHBORS

Survey of institutional structures of, and relations among, the South Asian countries, including: India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar.

T, F 9:55-11:10AM Kishan

 

POLS 3498 PRACTICUM IN POLITICS (crsl SOCI 3498)

Link between the world of scholarship and the workaday world is explored by placing students in internships in government and interest groups and investigating and critiquing theoretical literature of political science. (Instructor approval required.)

TH 2:10-4:50PM Peabody

POLS 4475 LAW AND PRACTICE (1 credit)

Based on presentations from a wide-array of legal practitioners, this seminar examines competing perspectives on the law and legal work, answers student questions about legal careers, and explores the differences between "law in the book and the law in action".

Meets every other week. M 2:30-3:45PM Peabody

POLS 4471 CURRENT LEGAL ISSUES (1 credit)

This Senior Seminar explores major legal issues "in the news". Students use primary resources, including Supreme Court oral arguments and opinions, as well as recent scholarship to examine the ways in which the law intersects with, and shapes, political debates, controversies, and policy.

Meets every other week. F 12:45-3:25PM Peabody

SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 1201 INTODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

A systematic introduction to basic sociological concepts: culture, norms, status, role, groups, character, structure, associations, institutions, community, and society.

M, TH 9:55-11:10AM Gadsden

M, TH 2:10-3:25PM Staff

T, F 11:20-12:35PM Weyer FIS

T, F 12:45-2:00PM Weyer FIS

T, F 2:10-3:25PM Thomson

T, 6:00-8:35PM Staff

W, 10:00-12:35PM Thomson

SOCI 2203 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH (crsl POLS2250)

An introduction to the methods of social research: research design, development of testing instruments and sample collection and analysis of data and preparation of reports. (Prerequisite: SOCI 1201 Introduction to Sociology.)

W, 9:30-12:00PM Larson

SOCI 2330 SOCIOLOGY OF MASS MEDIA

A study of the mass media, its organization, political economy, power, impact on norms and values and its relation to popular culture.

T, F 11:20-12:35PM Thomson

SOCI 3021 CLASSICAL SOCIAL THEORY

A survey of the development of the study of society through the works and lives of such men as Weber, Durkheim, Marx, Simmel, Mead, Cooley and Park. Prerequisite: SOCI 1201 Introduction to Sociology or permission of instructor.

T,F 9:55-11:10AM Thomson

SOCI 3308 DRUGS IN AMERICAN SOCIETY

The social and cultural aspects of drug use in American society. Emphasis on the causes and consequences of past and present control strategies.

M, TH 12:45-2:00PM Gadsden

SOCI 3351 URBAN SOCIOLOGY

The growth of the economic, political and social organization of American urban institutions; the social structure of the city, suburbia and metropolitan regions, effect of urban life on the individual.

W, 5:25-8:00PM Gadsden

SOCI 3498 PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY (crls POLS 3498)

Link between the world of scholarship and the workday world f social agency is explored by placing students in internships in public and non profit organizations while investigating and critiquing theoretical literature of sociology. (Instructor approval required.)

TH, 2:10-4:50 PM Peabody

SOCI 4433 ORGANIZATIONAL SOCIOLOGY

The study of how organizations affect people, what they look like, what current thinking is that they should look like, and how they can be changed to get there. Its format is experiential, drawing on in-class case studies and exercises as its primary mode of learning.

M, TH 11:20-12:35PM Staff