DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HISTORY 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR

SPRING SEMESTER 2001

 

Anthropology

  Economics

 History

 Pre-Law

 Political Science

 Sociology

 

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 2001 KINSHIP & GENEOLOGY

The study of kinship and family relations in a cross-cultural perspective as well as in-depth development of family geneologies and study of geneological techniques.

T, F 9:55-11:10 Rosen

 

 

 

 

ECONOMICS

 

ECON 2101 INTRODUCTION TO MICROECNOMICS\

Economic behavior of individual units in a market economy, demand and utility theory, cost and supply under different market conditions and labor markets. Public policy decisions on income distribution, antitrust policy, economic growth and the environment.

 

M, Th 8:30-9:45 Zwick

Th 5:25-8:00 Koppl

 
ECON 2202 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

Nature of economic analysis and reasoning, institutions and issues of economic policy. Emphasis on aggregate economics, including national income, employment, monetary and fiscal policy.

T, F, 11:20-12:35 Englander

 

ECON 2206 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

Empirical and theoretical analysis of the nature of the economic growth of the United States, including changes in the industrial structure and fluctuations in the level of national product.

M, Th, 11:20-12:35 Greenfield

 

ECON 2204 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS

Theory of demand, economics of the firm, cost, price, and distribution.

T 6:00-8:35 (staff)

 

ECON 2205 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

Survey of the history of economic analysis from mercantilism to Keynes.

W 5:25-8:00 Koppl

 

ECON 3304 INTERNATIONAL MONETARY THEORY

The balance of payments, foreign exchange systems, the adjustment under various monetary standards, international monetary institutions and policy.

T 8:10-10:45 Jonnard

 

ECON 3310 CURRENT ECONOMIC PROBLEMS

National and international economic problems presently facing the United States.

T 6:00-8:35 Englander

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HISTORY

 

HIST 1201 ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS 

Survey of the various cultures of the ancient world form the beginning of civilization in the Near East, India, China, Africa and Central America to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West.

W 6:00-8:35PM Weitz

 

HIST 1202 MEDIEVAL WORLD

Survey of the development of global civilization from the conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity to the Renaissance.

M, TH 3:35-4:50PM Holland

 

HIST 1204 MODERN WORLD: 1776 TO THE PRESENT

Survey of the development of the modern world from the American Revolution to contemporary times.

M, TH 9:55-11:10AM Evans

T, F 11:20-12:35PM McTague

TH 6:00-8:35PM Brewer

 

HIST 2292 ASIAN CULTURAL HISTORY 

Traditional India, China and Japan from their beginnings to the 18th century.

Highlighted are important cultural aspects of these three great civilizations with emphasis on the religions

that took hold there.

WEEKENDS 3/30-31, 4/13-14, 4/27-28,

F 6:00-10:30PM, S 8:15AM-5:30PM, Klass

 

HIST 2319 HISTORY OF GOLF

Survey of the history of Golf from its origins in 15th century Scotland to the present; employing a variety of methodological approaches while examining the game as a reflection of social, economic, and cultural developments in Scottish, British, and American society. Among the topics: amateurism and professionalism; racial and gender discrimination, and the role of the country club in US society; development of architecture; and the art and literature of the game.

W 6:00-8:35PM Ferris (Meets at USGA library in Far Hills, NJ)

 

HIST 2351 THE EARLY REPUBLIC

Introduces the main themes and events in the earliest years of the new nation until the mid-nineteenth century. Among the topics explored are the first and second political party systems; gender and race; development of market capitalism and its impact; the slave South; the westward movement; and reform movements and abolitionism.

M, TH 9:55-11:10AM Sommerville

 

HIST 2358 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES

The United States amid the turbulence of active world leadership and rapid domestic change.

M 6:00-8:35PM Klass

  

HIST 2363 AGING & GENERATIONS

Evolution of societal, political, theological, biological, philosophical, and psychological ideas of aging and old age in American society from colonial times to present as well as the history of relations, conflict, and cooperation between generations.

WEEKENDS 2/2-3, 2/16-17, 3/2-3,

F 6:00-10:30PM, S 8:15AM-5:30PM Finkelstein

 

HIST3325 19TH CENTURY EUROPE

European history from the end of the 18th century until the beginning of the 20th century. Topics include the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, the Congress of Vienna, the Crimean War, the unification of Italy and Germany, and the growth of imperialism. In addition, economic and political topics include the effects of industrialization, the emergence of socialism, and the spead of democracy. Social and cultural topics include the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, Materialism, and the notion of progress. These subjects will be analyzed through a combination of prime and secondary sources.

M, TH 11:20-12:35 McTague

 

HIST 3358 UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY

Explores the framing of the constitution, antecedents of American common law, the development of judicial review and the various intellectual leaders and eras of the court in both 19th and 20th centuries.

M, TH 12:45-2:00PM Sommerville

 

HIST 3359 THE GREAT DEPRESSION

The course will examine the causes and consequences of the depression. Particular attention is given to the programs of the federal government which sought to reduce the impact of the Depression.

T, F 9:55-11:10AM Evans

 

 

 

PRE-LAW

 

ENGW 3001 ADVANCED WRITING WORKSHOP

Principles of expository prose: focus on style, tone, organization, purpose and audience.

T, F 9:55-11:10 Steinke

 

HIST 3358 UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY

Explores the framing of the constitution, antecedents of American common law, the development of judicial review and the various intellectual leaders and eras of the court in both 19th and 20th centuries.

M, TH 12:45-2:00PM Sommerville

 

PHIL 1101 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC

Informal fallacies, truth and validity, principles and deductive reasoning, immediate inference, categorical syllogisms, compound arguments.

T, F 11:20-12:35 Winters

M 6:00-8:35 Nguyen

 

POLS 2250 POLITICAL METHODOLOGY

Methods of research: research design, development of testing instruments and sample collection and analysis of data and preparation of reports.

M, F 12:45-2:00PM Larson

 

POLI 3308 LAW AND SOCIETY (crls SOCI 3336)

Examination of Law as a determinant of social control and change and the analysis of legal systems and their administration, with special emphasis on law affecting the poor.

T, F 11:20-12:35PM Rosen

 

SOCI 2203 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

An introduction to the methods of social research: research design, development of testing instruments and sample collection and analysis of data and preparation of reports. (Prerequisite: SOCI 1201 Introduction to Sociology.)

M, F 12:45-2:00PM Larson

 

SOCI 3336 SOCIOLOGY OF LAW

Law as a determinant of social control and social change. Analysis of legal systems and their administration, with special emphasis on law affecting the poor.

T, F 11:20-12:35 Rosen

 

 

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

 

POLS 1201 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Structure and function of American national government; roles of interest groups and political parties, voting behavior, powers of president, Congress, bureaucracy and federal judiciary.

T, F 9:55-11:10AM Pope

T, F 9:55-11:10AM(FIS) Schiemann

M, TH 11:20-12:35PM Peabody

W 10:00-12:30PM Larson

M, TH 12:35-2:00PM Leppelmeier

WEB Enhanced starts 1/29/ 7 weeks (6:00-8:30PM) Peabody

 

POLI 1220 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

Analysis and comparison of contemporary political institutions and processes of selected countries.

T, F 8:30-9:45PM Woolley

M, TH 11:20-12:35PM Kishan

W 9:30-12:00PM Staff

M, TH 2:10-3:25PM Kishan

WEB Enhanced Starting 3/26, 7 weeks, Ogunsuyi

 

POLS 2250 POLITICAL METHODOLOGY

Methods of research: research design, development of testing instruments and sample collection and analysis of data and preparation of reports.

M, F 12:45-2:00PM Larson

 

POLI 2240 POLITICAL THEORY (crls PHIL 2205)

Analysis of the major works of significant political theorists from Plato to the modern world, with emphasis on their relevance to contemporary political problems.

T, F 12:45-2:00PM Schiemann

 

POLI 3308 LAW AND SOCIETY (crls SOCI 3336)

Examination of Law as a determinant of social control and change and the analysis of legal systems and their administration, with special emphasis on law affecting the poor.

T, F 11:20-12:35PM Rosen

 

POLS 3310 POLITICAL PARTIES AND INTEREST GROUPS

Interest group membership, structure and impact on public policy; components of American political parties, party organization and the party in office.

M, TH 9:55-11:10AM Larson

 

POLI 3319 POLITICS AND THE MEDIA 

The course will examine the relationship between the mass media and government. It will consider imperatives the media will follow in choosing to run particular stories, and how government seeks to take advantage of those imperatives to influence the media. Finally, the course investigates how the media try to arouse public opinion in order to influence government policy.

WEEKENDS 2/9-10,2/23-24,3/9-10,

F 6:00 - 10:30PM, S 8:15-5:30PM Greene

 

POLS 3329 JAPANESE GOVERNMENT

Answers the question: In what ways is the Japanese polity similar to and different from the political systems of Western, industrialized democracies? 

W 9:30-12:00AM Woolley

 

POLS 3499 PRACTICUM IN POLITICS (crsl SOCI 3499)

Link between the world of scholarship and the work a day world is explored by placing students in internships in government and interest groups and investigating and critiquing theoretical literature of political science. (Instructor approval required.)

T 2:10-4:50PM Peabody

 

POLI 4468 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS

This WEB-BASED course examines the election of presidents from soup-to-nuts: the Democratic and Republic primary systems, nominating conventions, problems of third-party candidacies, the general campaign, campaign financing, the role of media and television advertising, the Electoral College, and the effect of the electoral mandate on policy. Contact instructor at: professoralpapa@aol.com

Papa

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY

 

SOCI 1201 INTODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

A systematic introduction to basic sociological concepts: culture, norms, status, role, groups, character, structure, associations, institutions, community, and society.

M, TH 9:55-11:10AM Staff

M, TH 12:45-2:00AM Staff

T, F 8:30-9:45AM Staff

T, F 11:20-12:35 Staff

W 10:00-12:35 Thomson

 

SOCI 2203 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

An introduction to the methods of social research: research design, development of testing instruments and sample collection and analysis of data and preparation of reports. (Prerequisite: SOCI 1201 Introduction to Sociology.)

M, F 12:45-2:00PM Larson

 

SOCI 2308 GENDER AND DEVIANCE

Exploration of gender notions of deviance: relationships and absence of relationships between deviant social behavior- such as a crime, social control and punishment- and masculinity and femininity.

W 11:20-12:35 Gadsden

 

SOCI 2310 SOCIAL PROBLEMS

Examines the historical and sociological roots of critical social problems such as poverty, racism, sexism, and crime.

T, F 9:55-11:10 Thomson

 

SOCI 3022 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL THEORY

Considers major theoretical emphasis of current sociology, such as functional, exchange of current, symbolic interactions and ethnomethodological approaches. Selected writings of major proponents of these approaches will be examined and compared. (Prerequisite: SOCI1201 Introduction to Sociology or permission of instructor.)

W, 6:00-8:35 Staff

 

SOCI 3327 CRIME AND THE MEDIA

Examines of the relationship between the media and crime and criminal justice. Case studies and historical survey of news, television, censorship and crime.

M, TH 9:55-11:10 Gadsden

 

SOCI 3335 SOCIOLOGY OF HEATH AND ILLNESS

Examines the social variables surrounding physical and mental health, including study of the medical profession, the economics and politics of health care and the dilemmas arising from new medical technologies.

T, F 11:20-12:35 Thomson

 

SOCI 3336 SOCIOLOGY OF LAW

Law as a determinant of social control and social change. Analysis of legal systems and their administration, with special emphasis on law affecting the poor.

T, F 11:20-12:35 Rosen

 

SOCI 3337 SOCIAL CHANGE

Examines the theory and processes of social change. A comparison of evolutionary and historical modles of change; the role of population, technology, structural differentiation, revolution and other factors in social transformation and growth.

T, F 12:45-2:00 Spina

 

SOCI 3499 PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY (crls POLS 3499) 

Link between the world of scholarship and the workday world f social agency is explored by placing students in internships in public and non profit organizations while investigating and critiquing theoretical literature of sociology. (Instructor approval required.)

T, 2:10-4:50 PM Peabody

 

SOCI4461 ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY 

Examines capitalism, socialism, and communism as economic systems from a sociological perspective.

Emphasis is on capitalism's international aspects, shortcomings, and issues of labor vs. capital.

TH 6-8:35 PM Asimakopolos