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Tests Measuring Aspects of Phonological Awareness

Melissa Farrall, Ph.D. Rivier College

Test

Rapid Naming

Word Discrimination

Rhyming

Segmentation

Isolation

Deletion

Substitution

Blending

Graphemes

Test of Auditory-Perceptual Skills-Revised (TAPS-R)
Auditory Word Discrimination subtest
Identify whether two words spoken by the examiner are the SAME or DIFFERENT

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Goldman-Fristoe Woodcock Test of Auditory Discrimination (GFWAD)
Listen to words on tape that sound alike and pointing to the matching picture, repeating specified sounds in taped words, reading & spelling nonsense words, choosing pictures matching taped words broken into speech-sounds

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Test of Phonological Awareness (TOPA)
Marking pictures of orally presented words that are distinguished by the same of different sound in the word-final position

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Rosner Test of Auditory Analysis Skills (TAAS)
Say "cowboy" without "cow." Say "picnic" without "pic." Say "cart" without /t/. Say "blend" without /bl/.

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Lindamood Auditory Conceptualization Test (LAC)
Using colored blocks to represent differences or changes in sequences of speech-sounds

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Roswell-Chall Auditory Blending Test
Blending sequences of sounds spoken by the examiner

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Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Ed. Batt. Tests of Cognitive Ability (WJRPB-R)
Incomplete Words: Listen to a word on tape that has one or more speech sounds missing, naming the complete word
Sound Blending: Blend syllables and/or speech-sounds that are heard on tape

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The Phonological Awareness Test (PAT)

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The Phonological Awareness Test (TPAT)

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Phonological awareness refers to a general appreciation of the sounds of speech as distinct from their meaning. When insight includes an understanding that words can be divided into a sequence of phonemes, the finer-grained sensitivity is termed phonemic awareness
See Brody (1994) pp. 388-392 and Rath, L. in Brody pp. 101-140.

RAPID NAMING: speed and fluency of retrieving and saying specific words (a weakness in this skill is often associated with similar difficulties naming letters, retrieving letter sounds, and recognizing written words. There are two subcategories:

Confrontation naming: fluently saying the words represented by pictures
Constrained naming: fluently generating words in categories, e.g., words beginning with B or names of vegetables.

GRAPHEME: The smallest unit in the writing system of a language; letter symbols. (Brody, 1994, p. 390)

BLENDING: integrating separate sounds into a word, e.g., turning /c/ /a/ /t/ into "cat." "Blending refers both to recognizing separate sounds as a word when the sounds are spoken by the examiner and to integrating the separate sounds when "sounding out" (phonetically decoding) a word from print for oneself.

WORD DISCRIMINATION: recognizing how a spoken word differs from another spoken word. Word discrimination is usually tested by dictating two or three words (e.g., "cat, cat" or "cat, cap" or "pack, pack, pack" or "pack. pat, pack") to a student and asking the student if they were the same or different. Testing can be amplified by asking the student to repeat the words, say what the different sounds were, or say where (beginning, middle, or end) the difference was.

ISOLATION:

DELETION: removing a single sound within a word (e.g., "Say 'manhole' without the 'man,'" or "Say 'blend' without the /b/."

ISOLATION: identifying a single sound within a word, e.g., "What is the middle sound in 'bip'?")

RHYMING: Two words rhyme if they end in the same sounds. Rhyming is tested by having the student name words that rhyme with a given word or by asking the student if two or more spoken words rhyme.

SEGMENTATION: breaking words into component sounds, e.g., saying "cat" as /c/ /a/ /t/, or syllables, e.g., saying "segmentation" as "seg-men-ta-tion."

SUBSTITUTION: substituting one sound for another in a word, e.g., "Say 'bat.' Now change the /b/ to an /h/ and say it," or "These three different-colored blocks represent the sounds in 'cat.' I want you to take another block and change it to 'bat,'" or "Read this (dog). Now change the 'd' to an 'h' and read it again."